Spotlight on immigrants in Virginia

According to a new study by the Immigration Policy Center, “The foreign-born share of Virginia’s population rose from 5.0% in 1990, to 8.1% in 2000, to 10.3% in 2007….6.4% of all registered voters in Virginia are “New Americans”—naturalized citizens or the U.S.-born children of immigrants who were raised during the current era of immigration from Latin America and Asia which began in 1965
This is one of several state-focused studied highlighting the mainstream participation of immigrants in society and the economy. I have posted before on studies about Texas and New Jersey.
Highlights from the study:
Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians account for large and growing shares of both the economy and the electorate in Virginia. Immigrants make up more than 10% of the state’s population, and 44% of them are naturalized U.S. citizens who are eligible to vote.
1 in 10 Virginians are immigrants or the children of immigrants.
The foreign-born share of Virginia’s population rose from 5.0% in 1990, to 8.1% in 2000, to 10.3% in 2007, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
43.8% of immigrants in Virginia were naturalized U.S. citizens in 2007—meaning that
they are eligible to vote.
The Latino share of Virginia’s population grew from 2.6% in 1990, to 4.7% in 2000, to
6.5% in 2007. The Asian share of the population grew from 2.5% in 1990, to 3.7% in 2000, to 4.8% in 2007, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
Latinos comprised 5% of Virginia voters in the 2008 electorate.
Latinos comprised 5% of Virginia voters in the 2008 elections, and Asians 3%, according to CNN exit polls. Barack Obama defeated John McCain among Latino voters in Virginia by 72% to 27%.
Naturalized Citizens Excel Educationally.
In Virginia, 45.5% of foreign-born persons who were naturalized U.S. citizens in 2007 had a bachelor’s or higher degree, compared to 34.1% of noncitizens. At the same time, only 12.6% of naturalized citizens lacked a high-school diploma, compared to 26.6% of noncitizens.

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