Surge in Hispanic vote, November 2008

The Immigration Policy Center issued a report late in 2008 documenting the growth of the Hispanic vote in presidential elections (from 8% in 2004 to 9% in 2008) and the huge swings in the Hispanic vote from Republican (Bush) in 2004 to Democrat (Obama) in 2008. Obama also pulled a lot more of the Asian vote.
Some of the report:
Latinos Are a Rapidly Growing Share of the Electorate.
Roughly 11 million Latinos voted in this election, up from 7.6 million in 2004. According to CNN exit polls, Latinos accounted for about 9% of all voters (up from 8% in 2004) and Asians 2% (roughly the same as in 2004). The Pew Hispanic Center estimates that roughly 50,000 Latinos turn 18 each month and hence are eligible to vote for the first time. A post-election survey by the NALEO Educational Fund, impreMedia, and the Latino Decisions polling firm found that 92% of Latino registered voters cast ballots (up from 81.5% in 2004). 39% of Latino voters were foreign-born.
15% of Latino voters were voting in a Presidential election for the first time.
CNN exit polls indicate that Obama defeated McCain by 67% to 31% among Latino voters, and 62% to 35% among Asian voters. This represents a pronounced decline in support for the Republican Party since 2004, when George W. Bush won 44% of the Latino vote and 44% of the Asian vote.
According to exit polling in Los Angeles by Asian Pacific American Legal Center, Obama won the Asian American vote by 68% to 30%. Moreover, 24% of Asian American Republicans crossed party lines to support Obama, and 62% of unaffiliated Asian Americans voted for Obama. From 2004 to 2008, Republicans Lost Ground with Latinos in Key States.
“An anti-Hispanic attitude is suicidal. As the party of Lincoln, Republicans have a moral obligation to make our case to Hispanics, blacks and Asian-Americans who share our values. Whether we see gains in 2010 depends on it.” — Karl Rove, former Senior Adviser to George W. Bush, in Newsweek, Nov. 24, 2008.
In Texas, where 20% of the electorate was Latino, Obama defeated McCain among Latino voters by 63% to 35%. In 2004, Bush won 49% of the Latino vote—only one percentage point less than Kerry. In California, where 18% of the electorate was Latino, Obama defeated McCain among Latino voters by 74% to 23%. In 2004, Bush won 32% of the Latino vote. In Florida, where 14% of the electorate was Latino, Obama defeated McCain among Latino voters by 57% to 42%. In 2004, Bush won 56% of the Latino vote.
In New Mexico, where 41% of the electorate was Latino, Obama defeated McCain among Latino voters by 69% to 30%. In 2004, Bush won 44% of the Latino vote.
In Nevada, where 15% of the electorate was Latino, Obama defeated McCain among Latino voters by 76% to 22%. In 2004, Bush won 39% of the Latino vote.

Comments are closed.